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Fishing Trip Tips

Fishing Trip Tips

Fishing Trip TipsFishing can be a relaxing way to spend your weekends. It has been proven that fishing is one of the all-time treasured experiences of thousands of American families. However, any sport has its dangerous side and fishing is no exemption.

Majority of fishing equipment have sharp tools such as metal hooks which may lead to accidents when the fishing environment unexpectedly changes for the worse. Storms, hurricanes, wild currents, and other mishaps, could spoil your fishing trip.

If you are planning to go on a fishing expedition with family or friends, here is a list of urgent situations and what preparations you need to face each scenario.

1) Weather – Before packing up your bags and traveling to you fishing spot, consult or be aware of the weather conditions for the day and the following days. Whether you are fishing on shores or in a boat, you should be cautious of the conditions such as flash floods, storm movements and darkening of the skies. When signals such as extreme lightning strikes, you should head to dry land immediately.

Having a sun-drenched day is not really an “appropriate fishing day.” You should be aware that spending many hours with exposure to the sun could damage your skin. Be prepared by bringing sun block to avoid sunburns. You should be aware of heat sickness symptoms such as nausea, breathing difficulty, lightheadedness, and unable to concentrate on tasks. Prepare a supply of water or liquid beverages to keep hydrated.

2) Sharp fishing equipments – Since fishing includes many sharp tools, you should always be prepared to treat injuries by packing disinfectants such as medicated lotion or spray and hydrogen peroxide. If an incident leads the skin to bleed, you would need bandages, cotton or paper towel. Bring your own first aid kit.

3) Tangles – One of the most common fishing hindrances is wherein your line is caught in anything surrounding your fishing spot such as trees, logs, etc. Try to get your line or fishing rod out of the tangle immediately to avoid the problem that could lead into a major accident. You could either snap off the branches of the tree or carefully and slowly remove your line away from where it is tangled.

4) Bait – When you run out of bait, it could spoil your while fishing trip. Avoid this by splitting up the rest of the bait into halves, quarters or thirds. The worm, even if divided, could still move, so the divided worms could still lure your target fish.

Be prepared to face any scenario to keep your fishing adventure as relaxed as possible. With all these in mind, you could enjoy your fishing trip safely and successfully.

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Fishing Tips For Beginners

Fishing Tips For Beginners

Fishing Tips For BeginnersHere are many kinds of fishing equipments in stores, numerous fishing methods in books, and fishing advices online. To make it all simple, here are the basic things you need to know for your first time fishing adventure.

1) How to fish with bait

* Tackle. To plunk the bait, you should purchase lead weights. The weight of the lead would vary depending on the current of the environment. Anglers commonly use and recommend bank sinkers with a number-two hook.

To avoid sinkers to slide, you would need a swivel to act as a stop. To protect the knot, you could use plastic beads between the swivel and weight. Using two appropriate swivels could allow you to rig the sliding sinkers.

* Bait. The commonly used bait for all kinds of fishes is worms. Another popular bait is chicken liver. Remember to buy fresh bait and keep them cold to avoid them from getting soft and allowing the bait to stay within your hooks.

Some of the commonly used baits are cut-baits which include skin from fried chicken, fish entrails, grasshoppers, salmon eggs, shrimps and crayfish tails.

2) How to fish – There are three basic methods for fishing.

* Plunking – It is the most common method used. Use a suitable amount of weight for you to be able to take hold of the bait in a position which is against any current. An option in plunking is to use minimal weight for the bait to move along with the water current.

* Back bouncing – It is done by lifting the bait out the bottom and raising the tip of the rod for one to two feet. Allowing the bait to walk with the current, you should free the back reel or spool. Repeat the steps when the lure settles down on the bottom. Back bouncing is effective in deeper water like fishing in a boat.

* Drift-fishing – It is a simple method wherein you cast upstream or downstream. This may vary depending on the current’s amount. You should count the appropriate depth and start reeling.

3) How to fish from a boat – It is important to determine in which location you would perform your fishing. Deeper water needs heavier jigheads compared when fishing on shore.

* With heavy weight which keeps your bait near the bottom of the water and the line straight down from your boat, you are able to drift the boat along with any current. A good technique of fishing on boats is trolling slowly with a fishing device called bottom-walker.

Fishing is easy as long as you’re enjoying the trip. Bring some of your family and friends along and make your first time fishing a memorable one.

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Best Bass Fishing Areas

Locating the Best Bass Fishing Areas

Best Bass Fishing AreasWhat is it in bass fishing that everybody are driven on to engage on such activity? People get fond of bass fishing that is why every trend that they hear about it really catches their interests and as much as possible get into it.

“Where are the what…? Where are the bass!” How many of the anglers (tournament and recreational) go to a body of water you’ve never fished before, drop the boat in the water, then, ask this question to yourself? This is probably one of the biggest topics in bass fishing that an angler should learn more about.

Here you will be getting information on how to locate areas best for bass fishing.
Locating bass and understanding the water would be the number one question among bass anglers today. The next most asked question would be is which baits they should use to catch a “big” bass.

Now when you think about it, there are really only two (2) main topics that go hand-in-hand when it comes to bass fishing. If you understood more about these two, you would definitely become a much better angler, and they are:

1. Knowing how to locate bass.

2. Knowing how to catch bass using all the different techniques, presentations, and baits.

Learning how to locate bass can be somewhat of a challenge to most anglers because there are so many different factors that need to be determined such as:

1. Knowing how to read a map – this is the fundamental skill that you should try to learn because through a map it is easier for you to take on the appropriate location good for bass fishing.

2. Knowing the most practical places to look for Active Bass just after cold fronts and during early spring and late fall periods – weather condition must be especially considered as well.

3. Understanding water depth- this is an important element because the depth or the hollowness of the water will serve as a factor for you to know if it is a good location.

4. Water clarity- it could be easier for you to now have your bass fishing if you are well-oriented about the water clarity of your location.

5. Water temperatures

6. Seasonal patterns- this is in relation with the trend whether bass fishing is seasonal or not.

7. Locating structure areas

8. Finding vegetation areas

But there is more! Being a consistent bass angler is so much more than just getting in your boat, hitting the water, and casting your baits. That’s why bass tournaments are so competitive and exciting, because the more you learn about locating bass the quicker you can start catching them right? And hey, isn’t that half the battle?

Let’s start by looking at a lake map. There are two general types of lake maps that most anglers will use which are referred to as the; “Hot Spot” and “Topographical” maps. The differences between the two is that a “Topo” map shows more detail, and the “Hot Spots” map shows more fishing spots (well, at least they’re supposed to).

The secret (or key) in learning how to use a lake map would be to sector the map. What I mean by this is that I will take the map and study it for a moment (looking for areas where the fish would most likely be.) Next, I will (using a highlighter) divide the map in sections based on how much time I have to pre-fish for a tournament or how many days I have to just fish the body of water for fun.

The size of the sections will vary depending on contours, structure, and how many places I may want to check out during the course of the day based on what the map shows me. I am certainly not one to just cast bait into the water and work it for five minutes and leave; I will try an assortment of baits if I see signs of fish in any given area to try to establish a working pattern.

Here are some key elements that you can usually look for when it comes to locating bass on any given body of water:

1. Vegetation areas

2. Irregular contours

3. Shallow water close to deep water areas

4. Points and point drops

5. Various types of structure

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Right Gear Before You Go Fishing

Pick The Right Gear Before You Go Fishing

Right Gear Before You Go FishingFishing gear is normally called ‘Tackle’ and is used by sport fishermen and commercial fishermen while on the job. Gear that is added to the fishing line’s end is called terminal tackle. You will find fishing gear in different forms. Let’s take a closer look at some of these:

Fish hook

With a fish hook you can catch fish either by snagging the fish’s body or by impaling it through the mouth. Hooks have been used down through the ages to catch both saltwater and fresh fish. Did you know that in 2005, Forbes chose the hook as one of their Top 20 tools? These hooks are attached to lines or lures. If you’re looking for hooks, you should know that they come in different shapes, designs, sizes and materials. There are different hooks for different kinds of fishing. Hooks also differ according to the bait it is designed to hold.

Lure

This object is added to the end of the line that is used for fishing. The lure resembles fish prey and usually moves around to catch attention. The lure is placed on a treble, double or single hook. The lure is made to move as the line is winded back to the reel by jigging the fishing rod. Sometimes the contraption is attached to a moving boat. This is called trolling. Sometimes ‘flies’ are used by fishermen. These fly lures float on the water or float under the water to resemble insects.

Lures can be used on a fishing reel or fishing rode. If you’re using a lure for casting then you would normally cast it out and then retrieve it so the lure swims.

Bait

This term is commonly used by fishermen. Bait can be small fish or insects which are used to attract the attention of bigger fish. Plastic bait is also sometimes used as well as electronic lures. Trout and Salmon are not usually used today because of whirling disease.

Plummet or sinker

This weight is used while fishing to sink the bait or lure deeper or to cover a larger distance. The usual sinker is lead based and shaped in the form of a pipe stem. It swells in the middle. You will find brass wire loops on both sides so it attaches to the line. The sinker weighs about a quarter of an once if you’re going trout fishing but can weight several pounds if you’re fishing for porgies or sea bass.

Sinkers made of lead are now banned in Canada, UK and USA due to the risk of lead poisoning. This has increased the death toll amongst water birds and other sea creatures.

A swivel sinker has swivels on either side instead of loops. This helps fishermen as the line does not twist and tangle. This is especially useful while trolling. The slide sinker has a leaden tube which enables the lines to go through once the fish has bitten it. Here is fisherman is able to feel even a tiny bite when ordinarily the fisherman can only feel it when the sinker moves. Split shot can also be used on trout lines instead of a sinker. To prevent line entanglement independent swivels are used.

Fishing line

Any fishing cord can be called a fishing line. However, it’s important to keep in mind its material, weight and length. A professional fisherman will consider knot strength, breaking strength, castbility, stretch, limpness, UV resistance, visibility and abrasion resistance, prior to making a purchase.

Fishing pole or fishing rod

Whether you’re angling or casting, a fishing rod is essential to your success. The fishing line is joined to a flexible and long pole or rod. At one end you will find a hook. Your fishing pole can be any simple stick from where you can suspend a line and attach bait or lure. On the other hand, a fishing rod is more sophisticated as it has a reel and line guides. Length may differ from 20 feet down to 24 inches. It’s advisable to get a long rod especially for casting.

Fishing reel

This is used to retrieve the fishing line. This is achieved by mounting a spool on the axle. Reels are mostly used in angling along with a fishing rod. Some advanced reels can be mounted on a boat transom or gunwale.

Fishing net

This mesh tool is commonly used by fishermen. Nets can be made from artificial polyamides for example – nylon. It can also be made of silk or wool. It is knotted together for added strength.

Harpoon

This instrument resembles a long spear and is used to catch large sea animals like whales. Once the target is impaled, it is dragged in by a chain or rope.

These are just some of the fishing gear which you can purchase if the blue waters call you. Be sure to check for quality and durability.

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fishing equipment

Fishing Equipment And Accessories

 fishing equipment The sun is shining. The air is cool and crisp. Yes, this is a great time for fishing.

As you come to the edge of a swiftly moving stream, you see a great fishing adventure beckoning. You set down your tackle box and your rod and reel, slip off your waterproof jacket, and slip on a pair of hip waders over your fisherman’s vest.

The abovementioned are just a few of the many fishing accessories that are available to you from stores, catalogs and the internet. Read on to learn more about the accessories you need to make fishing even more fun.

The Fishing Basics

The backbone of your fishing equipment is your rod and reel. For the casual fisherman, the basic rod and reel is all you need. Once you are more experienced, you will better know your tastes and can upgrade accordingly.

Tackle ranges from simple to extremely complicated. Basic tackle includes hooks, sinkers, bobbers, fishing line and needle nosed pliers.

A net is also a good addition. Choose a net size based on the fish size that you are after.

High Tech Tools

Electronics have, to the alarm of purists, invaded the fishing arena. There are devices that help you locate where the fish are located. And there are alarms to alert you when you have a fish on your line. Those poor fish won’t have a chance.

Clothing For Anglers

Fishermen’s clothing necessities include a fishing hat and sunglasses to protect you from the sun. A fishing vest with lots of pockets comes in very handy. A good waterproof jacket is essential for keeping you dry when the weather isn’t. Waders, in thigh or chest height, help extend your reach by getting out into the water.

Other Useful Accessories

You should also consider: a tackle box, forceps, fishing knife, scissors, flashlight, wading shoes, and a fishing belt. If you are fishing from a boat, you will need a flotation vest.

Get Advice Before Buying

Before choosing expensive accessories, be sure it is right for the job and right for you. There are many factors to consider, so don’t hesitate to talk for help. Someone with experience, either a friend or a salesperson, can quickly help you assemble a set of fishing accessories that will maximize your fish catching odds.

The right accessories will make your fishing experience more successful, and hence, more enjoyable.

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Fly Fishing

Specialized Clothing for Fly Fishing

Fly Fishing ompared to outdoor clothing for camping or hunting, clothing designed for fly fishing is somewhat specialized. Fly fishermen spend time partly on land and partly in the water, making their clothing needs somewhat unique. The special items needed for fly-fishing includes waders, a fishing vest, rain gear, underwear, polarized sunglasses, gloves, and a hat.

For fly fishing, hip or chest waders are just about essential. Hip waders are good for fishing in small streams but have there limitations. Chest waders that go up above the waist are the best for almost all fly fishing situations. Chest waders come in two types. Boot-foot waders, in which the boot is an integral part of the wader, and stocking-foot waders, which require a separate pair of wading shoes. Many fly fishermen prefer to wear socking-foot chest wader made of neoprene.

A fly fishing vest with a lot of big pockets is a basic clothing need for the fly fisherman. The pockets are needed to hold all of the fly fishing paraphernalia that an angler needs to have with them. No one wants to have to leave the water every time they need something. A vest with Velcro fasteners is best because it provides quick and easy access to all your tools, but closes securely.

A good quality rain suit is very important. The best ones are made of materials that breathe, so that you do not get wet on the inside from perspiration. Make sure that the jacket closes securely at the wrists and around the neck. Having a hood on the rain jacket is also important.

When fly fishing, full length underwear under your waders is a necessity. The underwear will stop heat loss from occurring, if for example, you are standing in a cold stream for several hours. The best choice of underwear is made of wool. Other good choices are Durofold, which is a combination of cotton and wool, and polypropylene. The same guidelines also go for socks.

Although it is not an actual piece of clothing, a good pair of polarized sunglasses are very important for fly fishing. Not only will they cut down on the glare from the sun, but they will also make it easier to read the water.
Wearing gloves for fly fishing presents a contradictory problem. Gloves keep the fingers and hands warm, however, while fly fishing it is necessary to have full, or almost full, sensitivity in your fingers. Fly fishing gloves leave the last joint of the fingers free allowing for the sensitivity that is needed.

To a fly fisherman, his hat is very important. It should be wide brimmed so it protects your face, ears, and the back of your neck. It protects not only from the weather, but also from hooks if a poor cast or a gust of wind carries the fly toward your head.

Wearing the correct clothing will not only keep you safer and drier, but it will add to your enjoyment of the sport of fly fishing.

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Fishing Equipment Tips

Fishing Equipment Tips

Fishing Equipment TipsCheap Sinkers
Spark plugs make excellent disposable sinkers. Need some cheap (free) fishing weights? Go to any gas station and ask for them. Then, loop a rubber band through the electrode and then tapping the wire down the plug can be attached to a loop of monofilament. The rubber band stretches when the plug is hung up, and even if the extra stretching force isn’t enough to break free, the band will break before the monofilament.

Jig Weights
Jigs are one of the most versatile game-fish catchers in either fresh or saltwater. It is so important to have the right weight jig for your line weight. If the jig is too heavy for the line, you will loose your jig far too easily. If the jig is too light for the line, its swimming pattern will be disrupted and it won’t be ass effective. This simple chart will help you select the correct jig:

Line Strength Jig Size
4-lb. Test 1/16 to 1/8 oz.
6-lb. Test 1/8 to ¼ oz.
8-lb. Test ¼ to 3/8 oz.
10-lb. Test ¼ to ½ oz.
12-lb. Test 3/8 to 5/8 oz.
14 to 20-lb. Test 5/8 to ¾ oz

Treble Hook Replacement
When replacing the treble hooks on your lures, there are a few things to consider. Chang the split ring too because it is subject to stress and rust. Use a stainless-steel split ring for strength. They do not spread or rust as to most of those that come wit h the plugs. Don’t, however, use stainless steel hooks – they are more easily bent out of shape by a fighting fish. Also, if a fish gets away with your plug, stainless steel will not rust out, as a plain steel hook will. Lastly, get some split-ring pliers – they make changing your hooks easy.

Extra Springs
If you use a spinning reel, you have probably had a spring break when the fishing gets really hot. Always carry extras (use a 35mm-film canister) – and make sure to have a little screwdriver along as well. Practice changing it before you go out

No-slip Soles
If your winter boot soles are worn, just cut the liner to match the sole of an old sneaker. Fasten the felt to the sneaker sole with a non-soluble glue. Please a heavy object on top of the sneaker overnight, and by morning you have an all purpose non-slip shoe.

Snag-proof Spinners
Treble hooks are oftentimes “trouble” when using spinners, causing snags. Make them snag-free by removing the treble hook and replace with a single hook. Next thread on a three to four inch twister-tail grub and Texas-rig it.

Downriggers
Need to drop your bait down deep? Fish are very uncooperative creatures, and don’t always hang out near the surface. If your depth sounder is alerting you to fish down deeper, a downrigger can really help out.
If you aren’t exactly sure what it is, it is simple. It is a spool holding between 200-600 feet of steel cable. There is a weight attached that is between 6-12 pounds. Additionally there is a quick-release line gripper, just like a clothespin.
The fishing lines from your rods are attached to the quick-release mechanisms. Then the entire thing is dropped down to the depth you want. The bait is far enough from the weight and line gripper not to spook the fish. If you get a bite, the line is released from the gripper, so it is just you and the fish!
Some downriggers have fish-attractant properties (either electrical, or a special kind of paint), but not most of them.
Downriggers work great for deep trolling, and some even have an electronic crank that will bring everything up. If you need to get at deeper schools of fish, these are highly recommended.

Nail Polish Helps
Does your spoon, spinner, or plug get the paint chipped after only a few casts? Use clear fingernail polish to protect the paint and increase durability. Carry a bottle with you when you are fishing, and give it a shot.

Ferrules
If there is dirt on your ferrule it can contribute to rapid wear. Make a plug out of wood to help keep the female ferrule clean.
Is your ferrule stuck? Use “Liquid Wrench”, which you can get at any auto-parts store. Just spray it around the male ferrule and let it drip down. In a few minutes you will be able to pull it apart.

Getting Out Line Tangles
Use a pair of large fabric needles to work out these tangles. They have a smooth finish which won’t damage the line as you work the mess out. They are also handy to sew canvas tarp, leather, or carpet strips.

Pocket Tackle box
Attach a cord to your pocket tackle box, so you don’t worry about dropping it in the water or leaving it behind. Just drill an undersized hole near the back of the box and insert a small eye-screw. A know will stop the cord from slipping through the eye. Just put a clip on the other end so that you can secure the rope to a belt loop or buttonhole.

Avoiding Line Twist
Line twist is the leading cause of fouled fishing. To check for it, pull off enough line to span your outstretched hands – about 6 feet. Next, bring your hands together in front of you, causing the line to drop into a loop. If the loop wraps around itself, you have line twist. Remove it by trolling about 100 feet of line behind a boat. Next install a ball-bearing swivel to prevent future line twist.

Knots Are Key
One of the most important things in losing or landing a hooked fish is your knot. Be certain the knot you are tying is strong and properly tied.
To make sure, tie your usual knot and test it against other knots. A good test is to take two four-inch sections of a broom handle with the screw eye in the center of each. Tie a knot in each screw eye and pull steadily until you see which knot survives. Do it 10 times to get an average. The knot that holds best should be your new knot.

Anchor Pulley, Keep it Quiet
If you use an anchor pulley, you risk spooking the fish as most pulleys eventually start to squeak. Try this alternative to a pulley:
Get a large U-bolt, a few nuts and washers, and an old-style glass or porcelain fencepost insulator.
Slip the insulator on a U-bolt, drill a couple of holes to accommodate the bolt, and tighten it to the mounting surface. The anchor rope will slide freely in the insulator’s groove, and the anchor lowers and raises as effortlessly as with a pulley, especially once the rope is wet.

Casting Poppers
Casting poppers with a fly rod is awkward. To get better distance bore a slightly undersized small hole in the popper, just big enough to fit a BB in. It should fit snugly and will give you another 30 feet of casting distance at least.

Cheap and easy depth finder
Using two felt-tipped markers (red and black) mark an anchor rope as follows: A single red mark around the rope at five feet, a red and black mark at 10 feet, a single red mark at 15 feet, two black marks at 20 feet, a single red and two black marks at 25 feet and three black marks at 30. Use the color code red for every five feet and multiples of black for 10 feet.

Netting baitfish
Increases the efficiency of your minnow scoop by putting a bend in it. Just turn the wire handle down 90 degrees, then push the net back on line. The forward-positioned net makes it much easier to trap a baitfish against the inside of an open-top bucket.

A Cheap Anchor For A Fishing Boat
For holding a good-sized boat over a rocky bottom, use a large swivel snap to fasten four fee of heavy chain to a standard mushroom anchor. You can get one from a junkyard. The chain boosts the anchor’s weight and holding power, provides convenient handles for lowering and raising, and gives extra leverage when an anchor jams in rocks or snags. When he brings it aboard, he coils the heavy chain on a bed of old foam-rubber pads so it doesn’t rattle around or dent his boat. In calm water, he simply unsnaps the chain and uses the mushroom anchor by itself.

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Basic Guides on Bass Fishing

Learn some Basic Guides on Bass Fishing

Basic Guides on Bass FishingAs you spend more and more hours and days on bass fishing, you will acquire lots of knowledge about the right lure and technique for the proper way to do this sport. The best advice most experienced and seasoned bass fishermen, is to examine the fishing conditions, ask for tips from anglers familiar with the waters you are fishing in, and finally, try many different lures and bass-fishing techniques until you discover what works most effectively to the situation, and which one you are most comfortable with.

Here are some Guides to Bass Fishing to become a better Bass Fisher.

The Technique:

The bait must fall to the preferred depth, then you have to shake the rod tip. By this, you’ll be getting the fishes attention. Do this for at least 30 seconds, then shaking again for about 2 or 3 seconds intervals, stop and pull slowly about six inches. Then dropping again, slowly back and down and repeating the process. The first thing to remember if they’re not biting is to slow down.

Tips:

• During Springtime, fish uphill (position the boat in shallow water and cast to deep water) and use a 1/8 ounce weight.

• Fish downhill in Fall.

• Try to use a Texas rigged worm to prevent hang-ups.

• Fish out the worm and keep suspended 90% of the time.

• Always try to sharpen the hooks to make sure you have maximized your hookup percentage.

• When doodling, it is critical to keep your presentation natural by downsizing your hooks to 1/0 or lower, and paying delicate, attention to how straight your bait is in order to maintain a natural presentation.

• Crystal clear waters can be tough. The secret to fishing weenie worms is to keep slack on your line and “shake” the bait instead of dragging. The shaking of the rod and your light line gives your worm, grub or reaper an amazing action.

When to Go:

When the bass quit hitting during the daytime and when it becomes uncomfortably hot on the lake are good signals that it’s time to start night fishing. Night fishing is usually practiced when the water is in the mid-60s or warmer.

Places to Fish:

Where to fish at night is a question commonly asked by bass fishermen. Bass don’t move great distances in most situations. Smallmouth bass, especially, are proven stay-at-homes. As the summer wears on, the bass tend to move deeper and won’t come up shallow, even at night in many lakes. Night fishing is productive when the bass are within the 20-foot zone

Tips and Guides

• Position yourself only as far away as water clarity dictates; stay close enough for consistent accuracy.

• Try to make the lure land on the water with as little noise as possible. Cast past the target when possible.

• In windy weather, put tension on the line just before the lure touches down. This will straighten out the line and prevent it from blowing across obstructions.

• Learn casting techniques that permit a low trajectory, such as flipping, pitching, sidearm casting and underhand casting.

• Use a quality rod and reel matched to the weight of the lure. Rods with a stiff blank but relatively fast (limber) tip are easier to cast than extremely stiff or uniformly limber rods.

• Cast with the wrist, not the arm and shoulder.

• Lower the lure a few inches below the rod tip before casting; this gives extra momentum for the cast.

• Be sure to “load” the rod tip, causing it to bend backward, on the back-cast, then whip the rod forward smoothly.

• Fill the spool of any type reel to within 1/8 inch of the lip of the spool. DO NOT OVERFILL!

The Flip-Cast; use your wrist, NOT your arm.

• Concentrate on the spot you want to hit, not on what you want to miss.
• Use plenty of scent when trying to penetrate thick cover – it acts as a lubricant.
• Stick to basic jig colors (black/blue, brown/brown, black/chartreuse).
• Use a plastic worm with a glass bead between the worm and the weight for inactive fish.
• If you think it’s a strike, reel down until your rod is in a hookset position before you check.
• A strike is anything different (something you wouldn’t feel in a bathtub!).
• Tighten your drag all the way down for better hooksets.
• Use 17 to 25 pound test line for bait casting gear, 10 to 14 pound test on spinning (for flipping finesse baits).

In order to establish a pattern it is essential you understand how a bass lives in its environment. Knowing where the bass can be found at any given time or place is something you must develop. Always go fishing with a plan in mind.

Remember that every fish you catch can reveal clues on how to catch another. After establishing a pattern, realize that when the action slows down in the area you were fishing, you can then search for more areas that would fill the same criteria.

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